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    Looking after baby rabbits

    Articlepet health guidesTuesday 28 May 2013
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    If you have a pregnant rabbit and you are wondering how to look after it them continue reading as we have drawn up a guide on the best ways to look after them including, most importantly the mother. It can be an amazing accomplishment to help bring in new animals to the world but you will need to provide as much care and attention as possible to make sure these new born rabbits are as healthy as possible.
     
    Before we begin, the correct names for rabbits are as follows:
     
    Father: Buck
    Mother: Doe
    Baby: Kit
     
    • The first thing you should make sure is that the doe is kept after is well as possible. It is the mum who will be doing most of the work for her babies and if she has good health and being provided with good nutrition then this will be passed on to her kits. Kits are cared for by their mothers until they can start eating pellets. In the worst case scenario, if a mother is not fed well, then she will eat her own kits.
    • Make sure the doe gives birth in a good environment with good surroundings. Make sure that there is plenty of hay and shavings on the floor to provide a comfortable setting for the kits. Provide also a heating lamp that covers an area of this nesting cage. This is so it can provide much needed warmth if the conditions become too cold. If they are born on a cage then they may die.
    • Check for dead kits. Unfortunately, dead kits are common in litters, especially large ones and they should be removed as soon as possible. Try to tempt the doe away with a carrot or a treat. While she is gone then check for the dead kits whilst trying not to disturb or touch the alive ones.
    • Be careful with feeding. Baby rabbits will not eat pellets until they are weaned at 8 weeks. Never feed a kit greens until they are at least 6 years old.
    • It is best to keep the Buck away from the does for 2 months as he could easily get the doe pregant again on the very same day she gives birth and later on the he can get the kits pregnant.
    • Do not be worried if your doe is not with the kits 24/7. It is natrual that rabbits keep a safe distance from their young due to the past when predators would find, kill and eat a doe and all her kits. She will often watch from a safe distance. This is normal behaviour. It is likely that she will feed her offspring only once or twice a day. Also as humans, try to keep away from this so that she does not get stressed.
    Source: Wikihow
     
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