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    Using Dog Doors

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 27 November 2012
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    Dog flaps or doors are usedto give dogs the freedom of letting themselves in and out of a house into theback garden. They can be extremely useful in day to day life as the dog doesnot rely on humans to get around the home and garden. You will find that mostdogs begin using doggy doors straight away, but there are plenty that arescared of them too. Read the following advice for tips on training your puppyto use a dog door.

     

    Why are they Afraid?

    Doggie doors can frightenpuppies and dogs, especially if they have been rescued. The fear of beingtrapped and the noise that the flap makes can be more than enough to make a dogcower away from a dog door. If your dog is reluctant to use the door, thesesteps should help you out in getting him used to it if used over the course ofa few days at a time.

     

    • Remove the flap that covers the door, or tape it out of the way. Ensure that the dog can see fully through the opening to the outside area. From the outside, use treats or toys to try and lure the dog through the hole. Once the dog has successfully gone through the dog door with the dog flaps out of the way, you can move onto the next step.

     

    • Keep the flap off, but cover about a quarter of the hole with a cloth. The idea is to coax dogs through doggie doors whilst partially covered, and then increase the amount that is covered gradually, as the dog becomes more confident. Eventually, you should reach the stage where the entire dog door is covered by the cloth and the dog is happy to go in and out.

     

    • Next, replace the cloth with a piece of cardboard cut to the shape of the doggy doors. Use the same principal as before, by covering a little more of the hole at a time. This should emulate the hardness of doggie doors without making a loud snap when it closes.

     

    • Finally, when the dog has comfortably passed through the cardboard dog flaps, you can replace the original doggy doors flap. Your dog should quite easily come in and out now.
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