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    Travelling this Easter? A short guide to dog hotel etiquette

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 19 March 2013
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    In the last century finding a hotel that accepted our 4 legged friends was near impossible. Many would simply not agree to have a dog on the premises. Now days things have changed and there are many hotels that readily accept them. We do however have some tips and advice to share to make the stay as relaxing as possible for the hotel, yourself and of course your dog.
     
    1) Check that the hotel accepts dogs and if they have any conditions as to what breed or size the dog is. The last thing you want to do is travel hundreds of miles only to find that the hotel only accepts smaller breeds meaning your St Bernard has to stay in the boot of your car. Other things to research are, is there going to be an addition fee, what is the policy in regards to leaving a dog on it’s own in the room. You should be able to find this information on the hotel’s website and if not feel free to give them a telephone call to find out more.
     
    2) Throughout the journey and before arrival to the hotel, make sure your dog has plenty of exercise and toilet breaks. The last thing you want is to arrive at the hotel for your dog to relieve itself in the lobby. This may not go down too well! It also doesn’t help when some hotels have a lobby with an outdoor feel including plants and fountains.
     
    3) If your dog often sleeps on sofas and furniture at home then this behaviour may be replicated in a hotel room. Show courtesy for future guests and bring blankets and sheets where they can rest. Furthermore if they have a bed then it would be useful to bring to this too for a good nights sleep.
     
    4) Be careful of leaving the dog alone in your room. Bored dogs can often cause havoc by chewing and ripping the furniture to pieces (and also clothes). If your dog barks then it could upset other guests and always remember to leave a “do not disturb” sign on the door so cleaners are not frightened when they enter the room.
     
    5) Talk to the hotel about areas your dog can and can’t go. For example any restaurants and cafes are most likely out of bounds as may be quiet resting areas for other dogs.  While walking around in the hotel always keep your dog on a leash. Even if your dog is friendly other guests may be naturally frightened and will want reassurance that they are safe. You can also ask at reception if there are any large outdoor areas or good walking spots nearby so you can give it the exercise it requires. From there you can also find other local services such as pet sitters or groomers.
     
    Source: Discovery
    Photo Source: jrubinic

     
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