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    Puppy Training Pads Information

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 27 November 2012
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    Struggling to train your puppy to behave around the house?Then it might be the right time to introduce puppy training pads into hisroutine.

     

    The potty training process can be hugely frustrating for anyowner of a new puppy, but using a puppy training pad could help your chances oftraining a puppy successfully. Learn more about puppy pads training below.

     

     

     

     

    Puppy House Training Pads: Why Buy?

     

    • Install a puppy’s crate in an area of the home which does not receive too much passing foot traffic – when you’re potty training, the puppy needs as few distractions as possible. The puppy will begin to associate this area with calm and comfort – two factors that are needed for successful puppy pads training. Try and make this area as homely as possible – for instance, if he has a favourite squeaky toy, try and keep it within this area.
       
    • Once the homing aspect described above is completed, it’s time to concentrate on the feeding schedule. House training a puppy with puppy training pads is all about good discipline, so you’ll need to introduce a strict feeding schedule right from the start. If you can begin to judge the puppy’s feeding and subsequent toilet routine, potty training using a puppy training pad will become far easier to control. Remember that puppies are most likely to go to the toilet straight after feeding and naps.
       
    • Lay down puppy training pads at certain intervals around the house – it’s usually best to keep these pads as far away from the bedding area as possible as even a carefree puppy has the intelligence to realise the smell of waste  where you sleep isn’t particularly welcoming! 
       
    • You can easily spot the signs of a puppy desperate to go to the toilet – it may start whining, pacing the floor or sniffing around in unusual places. If you manage to notice this behaviour, try and move the puppy onto the training pad as quickly as possible.
       
    • Stay patient. The puppy may not start to use the pads for several days. Gently encourage him to use the puppy training pad, and if he starts to exhibit signs of needing the toilet, gently hold him on the pad. Offer your puppy a treat for good behaviour if he heads to the pad without assistance. The carrot will always outweigh the stick in this instance.
       
    • Allow the dog to use the puppy house training pads for a couple of weeks – but over time you should try and train the dog to stop going to toilet in the house full stop. As the dog grows, its bladder should also become stronger, and its need to go to the toilet will decrease, so you can start taking a dog for a long walk in the morning and evening to allow it to get some exercise and do its business at the same time. Additional puppy accessories may also help with the training process.

     

     

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