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    How To Look After Kakarikis

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 27 November 2012
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    The distinctive green plumage of Kakarikis makes them one of the most popular of all parrots to keep as pets. These intriguing birds will certainly make a big impression when visitors pop round. To learn more about caring for Kakarikis, read this guide.
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Look After Kakarikis – A Guide

    • As with any parrot, it’s essential to accommodate kakarikis in a cage that’s large enough for the bird to roam without feeling overly confined. In terms of the parrot family, kakarikis are one of the calmer of the species; a non-chewing parakeet that makes for an ideal starter bird for those considering the experience of keeping birds as pets. Despite the calm nature of the birds, they still require the same amount of space in the kakariki cage as other parrots.

    • They may have a gentle nature, but these birds love to stay on the move – therefore the cage will need to reach a good height. Similarly, you’ll need to focus strongly on the design of the bottom of the cage, as these birds also love to forage. Whether it’s grain or toys on the cage floor, these birds love to discover new objects – so make sure they are left with plenty to think about.

    • Sadly, there’s a strong tendency for these birds to die fairly young, especially in relation to other parrots and parakeets, so it’s important to monitor both the health and the routine of the birds regularly – if you notice any significant changes in a bird’s behaviour, it may be worth consulting a vet. Kakarikis can live for around 20 years, but the likelihood of a bird reaching this age is slim – most will only live for around a quarter of that time.

    • The birds originate from New Zealand and tend to come in two varieties - Red Fronted and Yellow Fronted. When you’re looking after kakarikis, don’t be afraid to introduce new birds to the flock – these sociable birds will be more than happy to welcome new company.


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