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    Dog Communication Guide

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 27 November 2012
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    Dogs can express their intentions through their body marks, smells and specific sound signals, and dog communication has proved a fascinating area of study for many scientists over the years.

    Research suggests dogs only have the ability to understand a fraction of the human language. Studies indicate that an average dog knows about 20-30 words, and even the most intelligent dogs will struggle to comprehend more than 80.

     

    Dog Body Language and Sounds



    Dogs can identify around 10 familiar tones. (Compared to them, cats use almost 100). Their sound signals are different versions of barking:  growling, yowling, yelping. A growl - depending on what tone and what accompanying body signal is used - can express uncertainty, fear, as well as anger and expectation. Scientists have confirmed that growling can impact on the stress of a dog, so it’s important to nip any aggressive action in the bud as quickly as possible.

    A yowl is usually used to express pain and fear but according to the height of the sound level or the tone it can represent, it can also be a mark of excitement and enthusiasm.

    Some experts believe that the ‘bark’ synonymous of dogs only developed as a result of dog being brought up by man, with the bark only developing its current tone over several centuries. Therefore, in theory, the sound a dog makes is an imitation of man, with pets adapting and responding to regular human interaction over time. A dog bark can mean a variety of thing; but only once you stop to consider can you determine a true meaning.
     

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