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    Bathing a Cat

    Articlepet advice guidesTuesday 27 November 2012
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    The chances are that at some point during your ownership, you will need to bath a cat. Cats are naturally very clean but they may get covered in something that they cannot clean off themselves. Unless you are one of the very few lucky ones who own a cat that loves the water, you will need to know the best way of washing a cat to make it easier for the both of you. This guide outlines how to go about bathing a cat.
     

    How to Bath a Cat


    • One of the most important things to remember when bathing a cat is to keep calm as it will make the whole process easier for both you and the cat. Cats can become used to the water over time and will not put up a fuss about it.

    • It may not be the water itself that bothers the cat, rather the process used to bath a cat. Many cats are not at all bothered about going out hunting in the rain.

    • One of the best and easiest ways washing a cat is to begin at a young age. A kitten is unlikely to take exception to getting wet, especially if you remain calm and make a big fuss of him the whole time. This way, when the need does arise to bath a cat, it should be used to it.

    • When you are bathing a cat, there are some things that you will need. The first of these is a specific cat shampoo. These can contain anti flea agents and are available from a vet. The only human shampoo that it may be permissible to use in an emergency is tearless baby shampoo. Do not use dog shampoos as these can be deadly for a cat.

    • You will also need a big towel, make sure it is dry and preferably fluffy. Warm it slightly so that it relaxes the cat when it comes to being used. A soft washcloth will be used to clean the cat and some people use cotton balls to go in the cats ears.

    • Having somebody help you when washing a cat could be very beneficial. Use a rubber mat in the bathtub to give the cat plenty of grip. Consider moving anything breakable out of the bathroom just in case your cat decides it wants out. Wear long sleeves and/or clip the cat’s claws to avoid injury.

    • Using your assistant’s help, place the cat in the bath and use the shower nozzle to get the cat wet. Keep the nozzle close to the cat so that it doesn’t hear the running water. Avoid the cat’s face and gently rub shampoo into it’s fur and work it so that it starts to lather up. Rinse of the shampoo making sure you don’t get the cat’s face wet. The water temperature should be the same as the cat’s body temperature (roughly 37-39ºC).

    • If necessary, use the washcloth to wipe the cat’s face without using any soap.

    • Once you have finished bathing the cat, use the large towel to lift him out of the tub and start drying. The cat will often start to relax at this point and a warm towel will help this. Some people use a hairdryer to dry the cat and this may work but other cats could be terrified of it.

    • The key to successfully bathing a cat is patience, remember that the cat is probably quite scared and needs reassurance. Always speak in low, calming tones and avoid getting angry at the cat.

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