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    Long-eared rare species of bat faces extinction

    NewsOther petsWednesday 07 August 2013
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    A rare type of long-eared bat faces extinction due to changes in land management and farming practises and have all but disappeared in the UK.

    There are said to be just 1000 long-eared bats left in the UK because of a dramatic decline in areas where they hunt for food experts have warned.

    A warning was issued by the Bat Conservation trust and the future survival of the species is said to be “questionable” according to Dr Orly Razgour who asked for greater conservation efforts to protect the mammal including adding them to the UK priority species list of the most threatened species that require conservation action.

    Why exactly are the bats struggling? It is said to be because of a decline in lowland meadows and marshlands where these bats gain most of their food. This has happened because of changes to land management and farming practises across the country.

    Dr Razgour calls for help in identification, monitoring and protection of roost sites. “The UK's grey long-eared bats need greater conservation efforts before we lose them,” she added.

    “Despite being one the rarest UK mammals, up until recently there was very little known about the grey long-eared bat and the conditions it needs in order to survive.

    “Studying the grey long-eared bat, I realised that the plight of this bat demonstrates many of the threats and conservation challenges facing wildlife, from the effects of habitat loss and climate change to the problem of small isolated populations.”

    They would usually stick to caves but recently have gone to buildings such as lofts or barns for roost sites.

     

     

    Photo: Wikimedia

    Source: Independent

     

     

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