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    Goldfish survives 21 months without fresh food or light after house fire

    NewsFish and aquaticsTuesday 15 October 2013
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    A goldfish has survived 21 months without fresh food or light in a pond whilst the pond was covered by debris from a house fire.

    The blaze which happened in Harwich, Essex happened in December 2011 and it was thought that all the fish had been removed from the pond. The fire ripped through five terraced homes after the fire started from the roof. Around 40 fire-fighters tackled the flames.  The fire was so bad that residents were told they would not be able to return to their homes.

    Smokey however was found in the pond earlier this month by contractors that were restoring the building. The RSPCA said it was a complete surprise that the fish had survived without any source of aeration.

    Plywood and plastic was left covering the garden pond following the fire. Barry Eldridge who is a building surveyor with Tendring District Council which owns the house said that "Smokey was discovered as the work on the house came to an end and the contractors were looking to fill-in the pond."

    Katya Mira from the RSCPA said that “Fish require oxygen in the water to breathe so it's quite a surprise that Smokey has survived so long in a covered-over pond with no obvious source of aeration.

    "It may be there was just enough in the water for him to survive until now.

    "It's lucky as it's likely the build-up of waste products and carbon dioxide in a covered-over pond would eventually kill a fish."

    Paul Honeywood of the council said that "It was quite a surprise for the contractors and extremely fortunate Smokey survived all these months.

    "It is great to know that he will be returned to where he belongs and will be looked after by the contractors until that can take place."

    Professor Matthew Gage who studies biology at the University of East Anglia said it was remarkable but shows how goldfish use everything available to them to survive in tough times. He said the darkness would have helped by keeping things cool. He also mentioned that Smokey would have eaten invertebrates in the pond such as insects and small snails. 

     

     

    Source: BBC

    Photo: Wikipedia

     

     

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